Surgery

Tympanoplasty and Middle Ear Surgery

Tympanoplasty and Middle Ear SurgeryThe ear consists of three parts; external, middle and inner. Middle ear includes , ear drum and ossicles. gristle and ear ossicles. Any disease that affects the eardrum or ossicles can lead to conduction hearing loss by preventing sound from being transmitted to the inner ear from the external ear. Such a disease can range from a hole in the eardrum, to the destruction of one or more of the ear ossicles, to the disruption of the ossicular chain. When an inflammation develops in the middle ear, the ear can be perforated and the inflammation can flow out. This hole often heals itself and closes. If it does not improve, hearing loss usually occurs with intermittent or continuous ear flow and tinnitus.Ear CareYou should not get water into your external ear channel. When bathing or washing your head, you should put a piece of cotton coated with vaselin jelly. When swimming, there is a benefit of tightly swimming over the petals with vaselin jelly. In addition, earplugs are sold in various sizes in the market and pharmacies.You should avoid strong burning your nose. This event causes the flora of nose to reach the middle ear by... ...

Read More

Otosclerosis Treatment

Otosclerosis Otosclerosis is an abnormal bone growth in the middle ear that causes hearing losshearing loss. Causes The cause of otosclerosis is unknown, but there appears to be a hereditary component, meaning it can be passed down through families. In this condition, an abnormal sponge-like bone grows in the middle ear. This growth prevents the ear from vibrating in response to sound waves — which must happen in order for you to hear. This lack of vibration leads to hearing loss that continues to get worse with time. Otosclerosis is the most frequent cause of middle ear hearing loss in young adults. It affects about 10% of the U.S. population. It is a disorder that gets worse slowly, usually beginning in early to mid- adulthood. It is more common in women than in men. Otosclerosis usually affects both ears. Otosclerosis can lead to not only conductive hearing loss, but to nerve loss as well. Risks include pregnancy (which may trigger onset) and a family history of hearing loss. Caucasians are more susceptible than others to otosclerosis. Symptoms • Hearing loss •  Slow hearing loss that continues to get worse •  Hearing may be better in noisy environments than quiet areas.... ...

Read More

Cochlear Implantation

 What is a cochlear implant?    A cochlear implant is an electronic medical device that replaces the function of the damaged inner ear. Unlike hearing aids, which make sounds louder, cochlear implants do the work of damaged parts of the inner ear (cochlea) to provide sound signals to the brain.    Who can they help?Cochlear implants can help people who:have moderate to profound hearing loss in both earshave profound hearing loss in one ear with normal hearing in the other earreceive little or no benefit from hearing aidsscore 65% or less on sentence recognition tests done by hearing professional in the ear to be implantedMany people have cochlear implants in both ears (bilateral). Listening with two ears can improve your ability to identify the direction of sound and separate the sounds you want to hear from those you don’t.How do they work?A cochlear implant receives sound from the outside environment, processes it, and sends small electric currents near the auditory nerve. These electric currents activate the nerve, which then sends a signal to the brain. The brain learns to recognize this signal and the person experiences this as "hearing".The cochlear implant somewhat simulates natural hearing, where sound creates an electric current that... ...

Read More

Advanced technology implantable hearing devices

 Cochlear Baha® Bone Conduction Implants For more than 35 years, people all over the world have connected to sound through a Baha® bone conduction implant. The Baha System uses the body’s natural ability to conduct sound through bone conduction, and has the potential to make an immediate and positive impact on how well you hear and communicate.Your natural pathway to hearingWhile a lot of the sound we hear travels to our ears through the air (air conduction), we actually hear a great deal through vibrations in the bone (bone conduction). When a person with normal hearing hears their own voice, most of what they actually hear comes through bone conduction.Problems in your outer or middle ear can block or restrict the flow of sound waves, preventing them from getting through effectively to your inner ear. A hearing aid relies on forcing enough sound through these problem areas, whereas bone conduction implants uses the body’s natural ability to transfer sound. By exploiting the full potential of this natural process – you can hear better and clearer than ever before.How it worksWhile a hearing aid tries to push sound through the damaged area, a Baha System uses the beauty of bone conduction... ...

Read More

Adenotonsillectomy and Ventilation Tubes for ear

 Tonsillectomy and AdenoidectomyWhat are Tonsils and Adenoids?             Tonsils and adenoids are collections of lymphoid tissue found in the throat.  The tonsils are located on each side of the throat in the soft palate.   The adenoids are located behind the nose and above the soft palate and generally cannot be seen without the aid of special mirrors to examine these areas.  Both tonsils and adenoids function to filter bacteria and viruses entering through the nose or throat.What are tonsillitis and pharyngitis?Tonsillitis is an infection of the tonsils. Pharyngitis is an infection of the back of the throat (known as the pharynx).  These two infections may often occur at the same time.  Symptoms of tonsillitis of pharyngitis are fever (usually greater than 101º F or 38º C), chills, sore throat and pain on swallowing. Why Remove Tonsils and AdenoidsThere are two basic reasons that otolaryngologists recommend tonsil and adenoid surgery (T&A). These are infection and obstruction. The infectious indications should include chronicity or recurrence as support of these subcategories. The infections may include the ears, nose, nasopharynx, adenoids, sinuses, pharynx, tonsils, peritonsillar tissues and/or the cervical lymph nodes. Obstructions may involve the nasal or oral airways as well as swallowing difficulties.What are... ...

Read More